Log In
Login with using your social network account
Password :
 
Log In
Law Books
Continuity and Change in EU Law
  • Publisher :
    Oxford University Press
  • Author :
    Edited by Anthony Arnull, Piet Eeckhout, and Takis Tridimas
  • ISBN :
    9780199219032
  • Year of publishing :
    2008
  • Format :
    Hardback
  • Pages :
    544
  • Commemorates the work of Sir Francis Jacobs, the most distinguished scholar and practitioner of European Union Law to have come from the United Kingdom
  • Provides a major reference point for the understanding of developments in EU law over the last two decades, gathering the views of key actors in the field
  • Includes contributions from a variety of perspectives: academics, national judges, practising lawyers and members of the European Courts
This volume commemorates the career of Sir Francis Jacobs KCMG QC, who served as British Advocate General at the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg from October 1988 until January 2006.

The essays in the volume examine the key developments in EU law over the period that Sir Francis served as Advocate General, one that saw momentous changes in the character of the Union and its legal order. It encompassed the Treaty of Maastricht, which superimposed the Union on the pre-existing European Community, as well as the Treaties of Amsterdam and Nice; theproclamation of the Union's Charter of Fundamental Rights; the drafting of the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe; the creation of the Court of First Instance and the EU Civil Service Tribunal; the completion of the single market; and the enlargement of the Union to 15 Member States in 1995 and 25 Member States in 2004. The period also witnessed a profound change in the nature of much academic scholarship on the law of the Union.

At the same time, the ECJ continues to grapple with issues which preoccupied it in the 1980s and earlier, such as the relationship between Union law and national law, the circumstances in which individuals should be permitted to seek the annulment of measures adopted by the Union's institutions and the scope of the Treatyrules on freedom of movement. The essays in the volume look at the persistent difficulties that have faced the unique legal system during the period of change.

The volume is divided into five sections dealing respectively with: general issues and institutional questions; fundamental rights; substantive law; external relations; and national perspectives. The contributors are distinguished figures drawn from a variety of constituencies, including the national and European judiciaries, legal practice, and the academic world.
Readership: Academics studying EU law, lawyers practising in the area, government and EU officials seeking to understand developments in the field.